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The Best Cities for Millennials in 2016

Our research team spent weeks reviewing the 100 most populous cities in the United States across 27 key features, chosen by millennials, in order to rank which are the best suited to meet the lifestyle demands of the millennial generation. The top three cities overall for 2016 are San Diego, Dallas, and Denver.

 

Overview of Research

Rankings.com recently conducted a nationwide survey of the millennial population asking which factors were most important to them when choosing a city to live in. In response to insights revealed by the answers, our research team spent weeks researching statistical data for the 100 most populous cities in the United States and evaluating each across 27 key features chosen for their importance by millennials.

We determined the final ranking using a weighted methodology developed to accurately reflect the responses to our survey. We did this by grouping our 27 key features into 9 core metrics: Safety (20%), Employment Opportunities (20%), Affordability (15%), Commute and Mobility (10%), Entertainment Options (10%), Weather (10%), Population Diversity (5%), Millennial Population (5%), and Population Growth and Density (5%).

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The Best Cities for Millennials in 2016

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Millennial Survey

The internet is slowly filling with city rankings aimed at identifying the most livable cities for millennials. But a quick read of most of them gives the impression that all of their key measurements were chosen based only on the stereotypical media image of millennials, rather than the reality of young, working professionals. They focus most heavily on ranking total millennial population, low rent, and access to bars, as if the top priority for an entire generation is the ability to quickly, easily, and cheaply find a similarly-aged person to drink with.

As a part of our mission to provide the best, most knowledgeable rankings, we set out to discover which factors where actually the most important to millennials when choosing a city to live in. In order to do this, we conducted a nationwide survey of people aged 18-34, asking them to rate the factors most important to them on a 7-point scale. Their answers contained some interesting insights.

Key Insights

Millennial Priorities

The results of the survey reveal a different picture than the one painted by many existing rankings. They show that, while millennials did consider several of those typical metrics when deciding on a city, they are usually weighted either too high or too low in importance. In fact, we found that some rankings would need to be reversed completely to accurately reflect the priorities of the millennial generation. For example:

  • Safety: An overwhelming majority of respondents identified low crime rates as their top priority when choosing a city, with the highest average response score of 5.7. And that opinion was consistent across all demographics. All genders and age groups, in all locations of varying urban densities, had approximately the same averages when scoring the importance of safety in making their living decisions.
  • Employment Opportunities: Low unemployment rates and more job opportunities ranked a close second on the list of priorities at 5.6, which is a far cry from the bar and coffee shop access emphasized by many rankings. Like safety, this consensus was consistent across all demographics.
  • Millennial Population: The factor that sits at the top of most rankings surprisingly finished second to last on the scale of importance in our survey of millennials. The age of a city’s population received an average response score of 4. For a metric that is so often touted as the most important, only 10.5% of respondents rated it as very important, while nearly 20 percent rated it not important at all. 
  • Population Diversity and Growth: The same could be said of all typical population metrics. Not only did millennials rank a similarly-aged population as being low in importance, they also responded the same way regarding ethnic diversity and overall population growth and density. All three of these metrics are weighted heavily in many rankings. But our survey revealed that people are more concerned with a city’s amenities than the type and number of people who live there.

Gender Differences

Though many of them were differentiated by small margins, the responses by gender to several of our questions are worth noting because they were consistent across all demographics: age, geography, and urban density.

  • Weather: Women ranked favorable weather higher in importance than men.

 Age Differences

Similarly, there were several insights contained in the ages of the respondents and their answers to our questions. Though the margins were sometimes small, they were consistent across all other demographics and illustrate the differences in the priorities of the younger versus the older members of the millennial generation.

  • Affordability: Younger millennials, aged 18-24, ranked affordability and low rent higher than those in the 25-34 age group.
  • Millennial Population: Younger millennials ranked a similarly-aged population higher than those in the older age group.

Geographical Differences

It was also interesting to see how some of the key metrics were region-specific. It seemed that those who already benefit from some factors (such as public transit) ranked them higher, while those who live without tend to view them as less important.

  • Commute and Mobility: Urban areas ranked public transit and mobility significantly higher than those in suburban and rural areas. Respondents in the Northeast ranked it far higher than any other geography, followed by the West, while Midwestern cities ranked it among the lower metrics in importance.
  • Population Diversity: Respondents in urban and suburban areas ranked ethnic diversity as significantly more important than those respondents in rural areas. The Northeast was the highest ranking region for this metric overall.

Methodology

How we selected our city list

Once we had our insights from our survey, we had to determine which cities to apply them to. In order to be relevant to the most readers, we decided to focus on the 100 most populous cities in the United States. People already flock to those cities for their economics, housing, and infrastructure, so they are already primed to meet the basic needs of the population at large. We saw an opportunity to examine them to see how they specifically address the needs and desires of their millennial population in order to rank the “best of the best” for that generation.

This gave us with the following 100 cities to rank:

  • Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • Anaheim, California
  • Anchorage, Alaska
  • Arlington, Texas
  • Atlanta, Georgia
  • Aurora, Colorado
  • Austin, Texas
  • Bakersfield, California
  • Baltimore, Maryland
  • Baton Rouge, Louisiana
  • Boise, Idaho
  • Boston, Massachusetts
  • Buffalo, New York
  • Chandler, Arizona
  • Charlotte, North Carolina
  • Chesapeake, Virginia
  • Chicago, Illinois
  • Chula Vista, California
  • Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Cleveland, Ohio
  • Colorado Springs, Colorado
  • Columbus, Ohio
  • Corpus Christi, Texas
  • Dallas, Texas
  • Denver, Colorado
  • Detroit, Michigan
  • Durham, North Carolina
  • El Paso, Texas
  • Fort Wayne, Indiana
  • Fort Worth, Texas
  • Fremont, California
  • Fresno, California
  • Garland, Texas
  • Gilbert, Arizona
  • Glendale, Arizona
  • Greensboro, North Carolina
  • Henderson, Nevada
  • Hialeah, Florida
  • Honolulu, Hawaii
  • Houston, Texas
  • Indianapolis, Indiana
  • Irvine, California
  • Irving, Texas
  • Jacksonville, Florida
  • Jersey City, New Jersey
  • Kansas City, Missouri
  • Laredo, Texas
  • Las Vegas, Nevada
  • Lexington, Kentucky
  • Lincoln, Nebraska
  • Long Beach, California
  • Los Angeles, California
  • Louisville, Kentucky
  • Lubbock, Texas
  • Madison, Wisconsin
  • Memphis, Tennessee
  • Mesa, Arizona
  • Miami, Florida
  • Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Nashville, Tennessee
  • New Orleans, Louisiana
  • New York, New York
  • Newark, New Jersey
  • Norfolk, Virginia
  • North Las Vegas, Nevada
  • Oakland, California
  • Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
  • Omaha, Nebraska
  • Orlando, Florida
  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Phoenix, Arizona
  • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Plano, Texas
  • Portland, Oregon
  • Raleigh, North Carolina
  • Reno, Nevada
  • Richmond, Virginia
  • Riverside, California
  • Sacramento, California
  • San Antonio, Texas
  • San Bernardino, California
  • San Diego, California
  • San Francisco, California
  • San Jose, California
  • Santa Ana, California
  • Scottsdale, Arizona
  • Seattle, Washington
  • Louis, Missouri
  • Paul, Minnesota
  • Petersburg, Florida
  • Stockton, California
  • Tampa, Florida
  • Toledo, Ohio
  • Tucson, Arizona
  • Tulsa, Oklahoma
  • Virginia Beach, Virginia
  • Washington, District of Columbia
  • Wichita, Kansas
  • Winston–Salem, North Carolina

How we selected which data to use in our methodology

Using well over 12,000 survey responses as our guide, our research team identified the 27 key factors most important to millennials. We grouped those features 9 core metrics and assigned various weights based on how each ranked in the survey.

Here is the breakdown:

Metric 1: Safety (20% of final score)

Metric 2: Employment Opportunities (20% of final score)

Metric 3: Affordability (15% of final score)

Metric 4: Commute and mobility (10% of final score)

Metric 5: Entertainment Options (10% of final score)

Metric 6: Weather (10% of final score)

Metric 7: Population Diversity (5% of final score)

Metric 8: Millennial Population (5% of final score)

Metric 9: Population growth and density (5% of final score)

How we scored our methodology

After grouping the sub-metrics into their core metrics, we assigned each city a rank of 1-100 for each data point. We then scored each state based on its rank in that sub-metric. The first place state received a 10/10, the second place state a 9.9/10, and so on. The final core metric rank was averaged from the sub-metric totals.

For example, our #1 overall city, San Diego, ranked 6th in Weather with total score of 9.5. That core metric is made up of four sub-metrics.

Here’s how San Diego ranked for each:

  • Percentage of annual possible sunshine: 28th
  • Average annual precipitation days: 12th
  • Average annual total precipitation: 13th
  • Average annual moderate temperature days: 5th

Once the sub-metrics were ranked, we took each city’s core metric rank, applied the weights (as described in the earlier breakdown), and calculated the overall rankings.

Understanding Our Metrics

Which city features are most important to millennials?

1. Safety back to metric

Very Important

20.00% of our methodology score

An overwhelming majority of the millennials who responded to our survey identified low crime rates as the most important factor when choosing a city to live in. Like most people, safety is a top concern for millennials. It received an average score of 5.7 on a 7-point scale. Therefore, our most heavily-weighted metric gathers crime statistics from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report for every city on our list. Each was ranked separately based on total number of violent crimes (murder, rape, assault) and property crimes (vandalism, burglary, automobile theft) per 100,000 residents. The rankings for both were then averaged together to determine an overall safety rank.

Highest Scoring Cities in Safety
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2. Employment Opportunities back to metric

Very Important

20.00% of our methodology score

After safety, economic factors dominated the top tier of our list. The first of those are the employment opportunities afforded by a city. Economic prosperity received an average score of 5.6 across all demographics. To measure this, we gathered unemployment rates from the US Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The cities with a lower rate ranked higher on our list. We then analyzed the future job outlook by calculating the net percentage increase of employers over the past 5 years, making note of any trends and ranking each city accordingly. Lastly, we factored in the average mean salary for each before calculating the final rankings for the metric.

Highest Scoring Cities in Employment Opportunities
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3. Affordability back to metric

Important

15.00% of our methodology score

The average survey response for affordability was 5.4. It was also interestingly a factor that was more important to the younger, 18-24-year-old millennials, as opposed to the older 25-34 set. But regardless of that difference, it still ranked as the third most important metric overall. In order to calculate it, not only did we research the average monthly rent cost for each city, but we also calculated the average rent-to-income ratio, which is a much better representation of the overall affordability of an area than rent cost alone. We then factored in the overall cost-of-living index score for each city.

Highest Scoring Cities in Affordability
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4. Commute and Mobility back to metric

Important

10.00% of our methodology score

Public transportation and walkability concerns scored an average 5.2 response on our 7-point survey. Perhaps not surprisingly, it tended to be more of a deciding factor for those respondents living in Northeastern urban and suburban areas than anywhere else. Areas that already had the lowest public transit ridership ranked it as much lower of a concern.

For this metric, we ranked each city based on its percentage of workers who took public transportation (other than taxis) or walked to work, along with average commute times. We also factored in the overall walk and public transit scores from Walk Score for each.

Highest Scoring Cities in Commute and Mobility
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5. Entertainment Options back to metric

Important

10.00% of our methodology score

Access to entertainment is a factor that ranks among the highest on most existing rankings (with special focus being paid to bars and coffee shops), but it is one that only finished in the middle of our list. However, with an average survey response of 5.1 it is still an important metric to measure. It is also one that was consistently more important to male respondents than female.

We gathered information on the number and distance to all of the bars, restaurants, and coffee shops like all rankings do. However, we also took it a step further and factored in music and theater venues, as well as all other arts and entertainment attractions easily accessible from each city.

 

 

Highest Scoring Cities in Etertainment Options
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6. Weather back to metric

Somewhat Important

10.00% of our methodology score

Weather scored an average response of 5 on our 7-point scale. On average, it was a more important factor to women than it was to men. “Good” weather can admittedly be a subjective thing to measure. So in order to do so, we relied on the responses from our survey which painted a picture of what is traditionally considered pleasant weather: sunshine, moderate temperature, and little precipitation. We used historical data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to calculate average percentage of annual sunshine, average annual precipitation days, total precipitation amounts, and average number of moderate temperature days.

Highest Scoring Cities in Weather
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7. Population Diversity back to metric

Somewhat Important

5.00% of our methodology score

The ethnic diversity of a population is another metric that factors heavily into many rankings, but scored in the bottom tier of our survey responses. A look at the demographics reveals some trends that may explain why some rankings score it higher than others. Most noticeable is the fact that urban and suburban areas rank diversity much higher than rural areas. The Northeast led all other regions in scoring this metric as being important. Women across all demographics also scored it higher than men.

In order to rank diversity, we gathered census data and used a diversity index equation to calculate how well various racial and ethnic groups are represented in each city’s total population.

Highest Scoring Cities in Population Diversity
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8. Millennial Population back to metric

Somewhat Important

5.00% of our methodology score

The current millennial population is a metric that typically headlines existing rankings. However, the millennials we surveyed only scored it a 4 out of 7 on the importance scale. That’s a steep drop from our highest average score of 5.7, showing that perhaps a millennial population isn’t actually as important to millennials as previously assumed. Interestingly, it did rate as more important to the 18-24 age group, as opposed to those age 25-34. It also scored higher with men across all demographics than it did with women, showing that it is still an important metric to some.

Using census bureau data, we calculated the current millennial population of each city. We also looked for signs that the millennial population was growing, so we gave special consideration to the percentage of that group that were newcomers, having moved to the city in the previous year.

Highest Scoring Cities in Millennial Population
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9. Population Growth and Density back to metric

Somewhat Important

5.00% of our methodology score

Our lowest scoring metric received an average response score of only 3.3 on our 7-point scale, showing that it was the least important metric to a majority of the millennials surveyed. Again, this is a metric that is favored very heavily in most existing rankings. The results of our survey aren’t to say that it isn’t a factor that is considered when choosing a city, or that it isn’t important, just not as important as it is sometimes portrayed.

To measure this metric, we used census data to calculate the current rate of population increase, as well as the number of people per square mile.

Highest Scoring Cities in Population Growth and Density
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Editor's Awards

San Diego, California

With a great economic outlook, near-perfect weather, and plenty of entertainment options, San Diego is the best city for millennials in 2016.

San Diego consistently scored in the top tier of more metrics than any other city. Its ranks in safety and employment opportunities (our two most important metrics as determined by our survey of millennials) helped to push it into the top spot. It also placed very high in entertainment, weather, and diversity, metrics that aren’t weighted as heavily as others, but helped to ensure that San Diego is one of the most well-rounded cities in this year’s ranking.

However, that high employment score takes on a new importance when you look at how poor the city placed in the affordability rankings. San Diego ranked well in the bottom half of all cities in our third most important metric. All of that sunshine and entertainment does come at a cost.

Drawbacks:

  • Low affordability rankings
  • Low millennial population

Ranking Results:

  • Safety – 8.8/10
  • Employment Opportunities – 9/10
  • Affordability – 3.1/10
  • Commute and Mobility – 7.1/10
  • Entertainment Options – 8.2/10
  • Weather – 9.5/10
  • Population Diversity – 9.3/10
  • Millennial Population – 4.2/10
  • Population Growth and Density – 5.2/10



Denver’s offerings have attracted one of the nation’s highest millennial populations, with more arriving every year.

Denver has a current millennial population of 21.4 percent, one of the largest in the country. Roughly 20 percent of that population has arrived in the past year. Millennials are flocking to Denver. With plenty of job opportunities, a positive employment outlook, and upper-level affordability, it’s not too hard to see why. While not one score outside of population growth particularly stands out, Denver does have consistent, upper-level rankings in most metrics.

Moderate scores in safety and weather were the only things that prevented it from taking the top spot in the rankings. So depending on personal priorities, Denver could easily be the most attractive city for millennials to live in.

Drawbacks:

  • Mid-level safety rankings

Ranking Results:

  • Safety – 5.0/10
  • Employment Opportunities – 9.0/10
  • Affordability – 7/10
  • Commute and Mobility – 7.5/10
  • Entertainment Options – 8.3/10
  • Weather – 5.8/10
  • Population Diversity – 6.9/10
  • Millennial Population – 10/10
  • Population Growth and Density – 9.6/10



Irvine, California

With the lowest number of violent crimes, and the second lowest number of property crimes in the past year, Irvine is the safest city in this year’s ranking.

The average number of violent crimes for the 100 most populous cities last year was approximately 678 per every 100,000 residents. Irvine reported 49. The average number of property crimes was 3658. Irvine had 1253. Our survey showed that safety was the most important factor for most millennials when choosing a city. Of all the cities we ranked, Irvine is by far the safest. It also scored high marks in employment, weather, millennial population, and growth. However, as with many of the California cities on the list, it did score fairly low in affordability. It also had a fairly poor showing in our commute and mobility metric.

But overall, if safety is your foremost concern, Irvine is an extremely attractive option, if you can afford it and have your own transportation.

Drawbacks:

  • Low affordability ranking
  • One of the least diverse cities reviewed

Ranking Results:

  • Safety – 10/10
  • Employment Opportunities – 8.5/10
  • Affordability – 3/10
  • Commute and Mobility – 4.1/10
  • Entertainment Options – 0.8/10
  • Weather – 9.4/10
  • Population Diversity – 0.5/10
  • Millennial Population – 8.1/10
  • Population Growth and Density – 9.2/10



Seattle, Washington

Seattle has one of the lowest unemployment rates and highest average salary of all the top cities, making it the best choice for millennials seeking employment opportunities.

Seattle has a current unemployment rate well below the national average, and an average annual salary way above it. That, coupled with an employment outlook in the top 25, makes it the most economically attractive city in this year’s ranking. It also ranked 2nd in growth and density, and 6th in commute and mobility.

Where Seattle really suffered in the overall rankings was a 78th place safety ranking, with nearly double the average for property crimes. It’s notoriously rainy weather also contributed to one of the lowest total weather scores.

Drawbacks:

  • Very low weather ranking

Ranking Results:

  • Safety – 2.3/10
  • Employment Opportunities – 10/10
  • Affordability – 5.7/10
  • Commute and Mobility – 9.5/10
  • Entertainment Options – 9.2/10
  • Weather – 1.9/10
  • Population Diversity – 5.2/10
  • Millennial Population – 7.6/10
  • Population Growth and Density – 9.9/10



Tulsa, Oklahoma

Tulsa has the lowest overall cost-of-living score of every city reviewed, with a below-average rent-to-income ratio to match.

As far as these rankings are concerned, Tulsa’s affordability is the only thing that stands out. They have moderate to low scores across every other metric, and the lowest score of all cities in commute and mobility. However, if affordability and rent are your primary concerns, Tulsa may be worth a look. They have the lowest overall cost-of-living index score of all the cities in this year’s ranking. They also have a slightly below-average rent-to-income ratio, bolstered by an average monthly rent cost that is $230 lower than the ranking average.

Drawbacks:

  • Lowest commute and mobility rank of all cities reviewed
  • Very low safety scores

Ranking Results:

  • Safety – 2.2/10
  • Employment Opportunities – 7.1/10
  • Affordability – 10/10
  • Commute and Mobility – 0.1/10
  • Entertainment Options – 3.9/10
  • Weather – 3.2/10
  • Population Diversity – 5.7/10
  • Millennial Population – 4.2/10
  • Population Growth and Density – 1.2/10



Buffalo, New York

With above-average scores in every category, Buffalo edged out the competition to earn the top spot in commute and mobility.

While they suffered from consistently low scores in most metrics, Buffalo did best all other cities in our commute and mobility metric. That’s surprising considering that their in-state neighbor New York City is the public transit king. However, a low score for the longest average commute time hurt New York’s overall metric ranking, allowing several cities to sneak past it and claim the top spots. With scores well above average in every sub-metric, Buffalo finished first.

Unfortunately, Buffalo ranked among the lowest in safety and employment opportunities, our two most important metrics. They had similarly low scores in weather and millennial population. As far as these rankings are concerned, Buffalo isn’t the most desirable city for millennials, but it is fairly easy to get around in.

Drawbacks:

  • One of the lowest employment rankings of all cities reviewed
  • Low millennial population percentage

Ranking Results:

  • Safety – 1.4/10
  • Employment Opportunities – 0.7/10
  • Affordability – 7.2/10
  • Commute and Mobility – 10/10
  • Entertainment Options – 5.2/10
  • Weather – 1.7/10
  • Population Diversity – 4.7/10
  • Millennial Population – 2.4/10
  • Population Growth and Density – 3.4/10



New York, New York

With 24/7 access to fun, food, and drink, New York City easily claimed the top spot for entertainment options.

In perhaps the least surprising finish of all, New York City claimed the top spot for entertainment options. With its famous music and theater venues, thriving arts community, multiple professional sports teams, and notorious party scene, it is arguably the entertainment capital of the world. New York is also one of the top food and drink destinations, with tens of thousands of bars and restaurants serving flavors from all over the world 24 hours a day. All of this combined to push New York City into the top spots in every entertainment category. It also ranked 2nd for population diversity.

However, that entertainment comes at a cost. New York ranked among the lowest in our affordability metric. And the weather is not ideal, with a high number of precipitation days, and a low percentage of sunny, moderate temperature days. But if cost isn’t an issue, and you don’t mind the weather and long commutes, New York City is a fun, thriving city for millennials.

Drawbacks:

  • Low affordability rankings
  • Low weather rankings

Ranking Results:

  • Safety – 7.3/10
  • Employment Opportunities – 6.2/10
  • Affordability – 1.3/10
  • Commute and Mobility – 9.5/10
  • Entertainment Options – 10/10
  • Weather – 2/10
  • Population Diversity – 9.9/10
  • Millennial Population – 5.5/10
  • Population Growth and Density – 8.4/10



Long Beach, California

Long Beach has near-perfect weather and plenty of entertainment options, but they both come at a high cost.

Most of the California cities in this raking were in competition with each other for the top spot in our weather metric. All of them have plenty of sunshine, minimal precipitation, and the highest average number of moderate-temperature days. Long Beach was the city with the highest number of those moderate days and handful fewer rain days than its nearest competitor, making it the top overall city for weather. It also benefits from a high entertainment score, and one of the highest ranks for diversity.

However, Long Beach was also one of the least affordable cities we reviewed, a situation worsened by the fact that they also ranked fairly low in employment opportunities. Overall, Long Beach is a beautiful, fun, diverse city to live in, if you can afford it.

Drawbacks:

  • One of the least affordable of all cities reviewed
  • Low employment rankings

Ranking Results:

  • Safety – 7/10
  • Employment Opportunities – 2.5/10
  • Affordability – 0.4/10
  • Commute and Mobility – 6.5/10
  • Entertainment Options – 8.6/10
  • Weather – 10/10
  • Population Diversity – 9/10
  • Millennial Population – 2.8/10
  • Population Growth and Density – 6/10



Jersey City, New Jersey

Jersey City’s large, growing millennial population is also the most diverse of any other city.

The city that ranked 7th overall is also the one with the most racially-diverse populations. Though that population may be smaller than some of its large metro neighbors, Jersey City has the most even representation of all ethnic groups among its residents. Diversity did rank as one of the least important factors in our survey, so that fact alone doesn’t necessarily make it one of the best cities for millennials. However, when you factor in its high marks across most metrics, and its above-average marks in employments and affordability, it is easy to see why Jersey City does have such a large, growing millennial population.

Jersey City has historically poor weather, and limited entertainment options, but overall it is one of the better cities in our rankings.

Drawbacks:

  • Low weather rankings

Ranking Results:

  • Safety – 8.3/10
  • Employment Opportunities – 5.6/10
  • Affordability – 6.2/10
  • Commute and Mobility – 9/10
  • Entertainment Options – 4/10
  • Weather – 2.6/10
  • Population Diversity – 10/10
  • Millennial Population – 9/10
  • Population Growth and Density – 8.4/10



Miami has a dense population that is growing at a steady rate, however safety and financial concerns prevent it from being an ideal city for millennials.

Miami’s population is growing at a rate of 2.2 percent every year, putting it at the top of our population growth and density metric. That number may not seem like a lot at first glance, but with a total population of nearly 420,000, and density of over 1100 people per square mile, you start to get an idea of how many people are packing up and moving to the beach. The city has among the highest number of entertainment options in our rankings, and a high commute and mobility score.

However, those are the only three metrics where Miami scored on the upper half of the scale. The city has low ranks almost across the rest of the board. Miami has a small millennial population. And if the results of our survey are any indication, it could be because of their very low scores in safety, employment, and affordability. If those are the three most important deciding factors for millennials, Miami appears to be one of the least desirable choices for them.

Drawbacks:

  • Very low safety rankings
  • Very low affordability rankings

Ranking Results:

  • Safety – 1.7/10
  • Employment Opportunities – 3.3/10
  • Affordability – 1.9/10
  • Commute and Mobility – 8.5/10
  • Entertainment Options – 9.5/10
  • Weather – 4.2/10
  • Population Diversity – 4.2/10
  • Millennial Population – 3.6/10
  • Population Growth and Density – 10

Last Updated on June 3, 2016

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